Research in Other Schools

lkj

RESEARCH IN BRIEF

A TERMLY DIGEST OF RECENT PUBLICATIONS

Issue 22 – October 2017

 If you don’t start a conversation from evidence, you must be starting from prejudice

Sir Kevan Collins, Chief Executive, The Education Endowment Fund

 Impact of EBacc on university entry is small

Pupils who study the full set of EBacc subjects are slightly more likely to apply for and to attend university, but arguably less likely to get into likely to get into a high-status university.  The researchers point out that any impact is small and that it is far more important to do well in whatever subjects are studied.  Read the working paper here.

Pupil talk can raise attainment

A recent study by the EEF suggests that properly implemented dialogic teaching can help to raise attainment levels in English, Science and Maths.  It should be pointed out that there is a bit more to this approach than simply letting the pupils talk generally about their work.  Click here for the full evaluation.

for more information contact: n.mcivor@stmaryleboneschool.com

 

RESEARCH IN BRIEF

A TERMLY DIGEST OF RECENT PUBLICATIONS

Issue 21 – June 2017

 If you don’t start a conversation from evidence, you must be starting from prejudice

Sir Kevan Collins, Chief Executive, The Education Endowment Fund

 WHOLE SCHOOL ISSUES

Late adolescence is a prime time for learning

Until ten years ago, conventional wisdom was that the most effective learning takes place in early childhood.  Recent research by neuroscientists at UCL suggests that there may be another window in late adolescence.  Read the original paper here, the Nuffield summary report here or the Ted talk here.

UK Students among the least happy – but still happier than those in Hong Kong or Korea

A survey of 540,000 pupils in 72 OECD countries and economies found that pupils in the UK are among the least happy – ranking 38th out of the 48 OECD countries. Interestingly, many of the jurisdictions often cited as models for the UK when attainment is being discussed – notably Korea, Hong Kong and Japan – score even lower than the UK.  (Find full, 500+ page report here)

Mindfulness interventions show limited impact

A meta-analysis of 35 studies involving 6207 pupils showed small positive effects on cognitive and socio-emotional outcomes, but these do not translate to improved behaviour or academic achievement.  Read the study here.

SUBJECT AND KEY STAGE SPECIFIC ISSUES

PRIMARY LITERACY: Two new guidance reports published

The Education Endowment Foundation offers seven practical evidence-based recommendations that are relevant to all KS1 and KS2 pupils, but particularly to those struggling with their literacy. The reports focus on core classroom teaching, while recognising that a small number of pupils will require additional support.  Read the guidance here.

KS5:  Unveiling the Mystery of Metacognition

An interesting study because although it was based on academic research, it was carried out by a real teacher in a real school.  Describing metacognition as students planning, monitoring and evaluating their learning, the report suggests ways of achieving this in the 6th Form classroom.  Read the study here.

SECONDARY SCIENCE: Spaced Learning shows promise in Y9 pilot

This programme aims to boost GCSE science outcomes by applying the principle that information is more easily learnt when it is repeated multiple times, with time passing between the repetitions. Pupils did an unrelated physical activity in the spaces between intensive repetitions of science content. Read the report here.

PRIMARY SCIENCE: Collaborative planning and analysis leads to encouraging progress

A US study of 144 teachers and nearly 3000 students showed significant learning gains among grade 4-6 (UK equivalent Y5-7) learners, although it required significant commitment of time and resource.  Find the abstract here.  Contact Nick McIvor for the full article.

For more information contact: n.mcivor@stmaryleboneschool.com

Issue 20 – March 2017

 If you don’t start a conversation from evidence, you must be starting from prejudice 

By Sir Kevan Collins, Chief Executive, The Education Endowment Fund

 WHOLE SCHOOL ISSUES

Major new study on ability grouping

A new meta-analysis of almost 100 years of research on the effects of ability grouping showed academic benefits of within-class grouping, cross-year grouping by subject and grouping for the gifted, but no benefit of between-class grouping. The paper was published in Review of Educational Research and you can find it here.

Research-based guidance on to make best use of Teaching Assistants

The EEF have drawn together findings from seven separate evaluations and published a guidance document for schools: Making Best Use of Teaching Assistants.  It contains  seven evidence-based recommendations to help maximise the impact of TAs and can be found here.

To teach critical thinking – don’t teach critical thinking

This 2007 article by cognitive psychologist Daniel Willingham draws on a range of studies to argue that critical thinking is not skill that can be taught.  Instead he argues that it is a capacity that depends on specific subject-based knowledge and practice.  For advice on how to develop the metacognitive strategies that make critical thinking more likely, read the full article here.

How much sleep do teenagers need?  It depends on what you want to optimise

A new study published in Child Development looked at 421 pupils from two high schools in Los Angeles.  Pupils who averaged 8.75 – 9 hours of sleep per school night demonstrated peak levels of mental health, whereas those who averaged 7 – 7.5 hours of sleep per night had the highest levels of academic achievement.  Read the abstract here and contact Nick McIvor for the full text.

PASTORAL AND SUBJECT SPECIFIC REPORTS

PASTORAL: What works for bullying prevention?

The short answer seems to be ‘nobody knows’.  Research shows that anti-bullying assemblies, speakers, and campaigns are not effective at preventing bullying, nor are zero-tolerance policies that remove students from school and do not address the underlying causes of bullying behaviour.  Child Trends has released a new policy brief on preventing bullying and cyberbullying with some cautious recommendations which you can find here.

STEM: Applied STEM courses can improve outcomes for SEN learners

A US study found that students with learning disabilities who took applied STEM courses significantly increased their educational outcomes.  The chances of dropout were reduced while maths test scores enrolment in postsecondary education increased.   There was a significant, but smaller benefit for non-SEN students.  Read the abstract here and contact Nick McIvor for the full paper.

For more information contact: n.mcivor@stmaryleboneschool.com